Thursday, March 17, 2016

Are You Really Experienced?

I saw her
in the bookstore
but she didn’t see me.

We went
to junior high school
together
but she fell off
the radar screen.

It was four years later
and I was
a high school graduate.

I knew a thing
or two
and I was going
to the university
next fall.

I won
a national
student journalism award
and gave the commencement address
at my high school graduation.

Most importantly,
I lost 50 pounds
and I started dating
and maybe even
broke a heart or two.

Yes, the world
was my oyster
back in that
summer of 1981.

So,
I stealthily
snuck up
behind her
and said

“Teri?”

She turned around
and smiled
“Hi”
crooking her head
in an inexplicably
cute way.

The conversation flowed
and I knew
she’d say yes,
so I looked
for an open window
to toss my invitation
into

and just as I was
about to ask her out,
she said

“Would you like
to meet
my son?”

As if on cue,
like a perfectly planned
prank,
a brown-headed
preschooler came ambling
around the corner,
holding a book out
to his Mom.

Dumbstruck,
my words stumbled,
I stammered out
a compliment or two,
and made a graceless,
hasty retreat.

Suddenly,
I didn’t feel
as sophisticated
or experienced
anymore,

but on the other hand,
I wasn’t
so embarrassed
that I was still
a virgin.

[For Open Link Night at D'verse Poets at http://dversepoets.com/2016/03/17/openlinknight-168/]

15 comments:

  1. Oh.. that had to be a shock... I think I have had similar experiences... (maybe more like growing a decimeter, than losing a pound)... but all that sophistication leaves when you see how life passes...

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  2. Oh well, maybe its for the best ~ I enjoyed the perspective from the man's point of view, smiles ~

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  3. Such honesty in your lines.. beautifully written!

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  4. Good build up and then the punch line!

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  5. Hey! Ho! Like the humour and the humility in this - it speaks to life...

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  6. Great coming-of-age story and, perhaps, being a virgin kept you from fearing who the father might be.

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  7. what a tale..we've all been there in a way, when someone else's life puts your own in perspective.

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  8. A touching & personal first person narrative, which may, or may not be auto-
    biographical; but so well written it has the feel of something you experienced. At some point, when we reconnect with old friends, like you do that first year on Facebook, there is no real possibility of catching up.

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  9. A great story, told with self-deprecating humour and humility!

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  10. A story poem - the angst of puberty remembered and then falling away. The realization that you had passed through that rite of passage and there were golden days ahead.

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  11. haha poor fella! Made my afternoon laugh sneak out :-)
    ZQ

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  12. True or not, this is a heartfelt tale, with humor. I can see start of a novel.

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  13. That is an absolutely brilliant storytelling - loved it.

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  14. SMiLes..
    it's alWays
    shocking when
    'they' find out
    who
    Clark
    N for
    Neo
    Kent
    was/iS aLL
    aLLaSone..;)

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