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Monday, February 01, 2016

Nightmare (Twelve Problems)

I awaken
in darkness
alone in my bed
(problem #1),
and I hear someone,
something,
slamming against
the front door
(problem #2).

The alarm wails
(problem #3)
and before
I can panic,
the familiar
beep-beep-beep-beep
of the code
is entered
which quells
the alarm
(problem #4).

I call out
"who is it?"
and there is
no response
(problem #5)
save for the sound
of breathing
and the opening
and closing
of kitchen drawers
(problem #6).

I attempt
"Who's there?"
but my voice
suddenly strained,
is whisper quiet,
(problem #7),
and I hear
the familiar squeak
of the knife drawer
(problem #8).

I try to kick off
the blankets,
but I'm inexplicably,
inextricably,
tucked in
(problem #9),
as heavy footsteps
plod up the stairs
to my room
(problem #10).

In the moonlight
I see the glint
of the blade
in the hand
of the approaching intruder
(problem #11),
as my body,
frozen in fear,
eyes closed hard,
awaits the plunge
(problem #12).

23 comments:

  1. Exactly that feeling of being tethered... like someone bound to be garroted is what I feel as a nightmare... also how logical and luscious the dreams appear... those problem statements can only lead to two conclusions... dead or a nightmare.

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    1. Thanks, yes, most of my nightmares find me in horrible situations and I cannot extricate myself. How claustrophobic!

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  2. Don't worry, I don't think your problems will last much longer! Yikes. This reminds me of my one experience with sleep paralysis, when i could hear everything around me--in a noisy dorm--but was unable to move or speak or snap out of the unpleasant dream I was having.

    la la Mosky! Dun worry, I'll save you!

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    1. Ha! One of the strangest things is that after I awaken, and I know I'm safe and sound, I am almost disappointed that I didn't die, only because I want to know what that's like before it actually happens. Quick, save me! La la Mosk

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  3. I am here and I can leave a comment! I have had nights like this without sleep, but thankfully no knives, grin.

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    1. Thanks for reading and commenting Unknown reader! Sleepless nights are torture, but I'd rather have them over nightmares. I wrote something long along called "Do Not Let Me Sleep Until I Awake" about how if I sleep too long, I remember my nightmares - but if the alarm clock wakes me up, I don't remember! Problem solved! Tra la la!

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  4. Oh my...I would have been dead before problem #12. When I hear a noise, I search for it immediately...thus I would have met the knife sooner.

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    1. I agree, but problem #9 did me in! Thanks, Mosk

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  5. The bald understatement and the clinical listing of problems by numbers makes this piece all the more scary! A wonderful write.

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    1. Thanks, as I re-read it, it's almost like a checklist for a cliched horror film!

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  6. Yikes! You built the suspense so well!

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    1. Thanks! It was creepy writing it.

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  7. Yikes--those are some pretty serious problems! Take care! Enjoyed the read! k.

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  8. double yikes!! good one Buddah
    And thanks for dropping in to read mine

    much love...

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  9. This is such a perfect unfolding of that sort of nightmare--the total fear, the paralysis, the slo-mo quality of everything ...great suspenseful writing, Mosk.

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    1. Thanks, I spooked myself writing it.

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  10. Love that this happens in snapshots. It's like we leave the nightmare at the same rate the speaker does. Brilliant.

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    1. Thanks, you talented and perceptive person!

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  11. Twelve problems for each strike of the clock. Nice work!

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  12. Made me hold my breath a little. Yikes. Awesome, and scary.

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