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Tuesday, July 03, 2012

That Lonesome Flag

That lonesome flag
flaps in the night
unseen,
red and white stripes
long faded to
pink and gray.

There were rules,
standards,
for its care,
but they’ve been
long forgotten.

Not having served,
I don’t have the
blinding, undying allegiance
to its preservation.

I understand
the political and
emotional reasons why
some reserve the right
to
burn it.

However,
just because I understand
the motivation
doesn’t mean that I support its
desecration
through negligence,
indolence,
or smug patriotism.

(For #OpenLinkNight at http://www.dversepoets.com.)

22 comments:

  1. Well said, my friend. Our symbols are so often diminished as much through neglect as through intent. The flag is such an emotive topic, on all sides. You manage to call out everyone in just a few lines. Bravo! And Happy 4th...

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  2. wow..strong voice in this..the love for you land shines strong even though you don't look at it with pink glasses...happy independence day mosk

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    1. Thanks, hard to write a patriotic piece without sounding jingoistic.

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  3. true man...it is a symbol...and though we may not agree with who sits in the seat, it stands for something far greater than what we have become and what we have made of it....

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    1. Agreed. "When it says "We the People" that means me too." - Lou Reed

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  4. I agree. It is a symbol.
    Happy July 4th :)

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    1. Yes, it's a symbol, but it's interpreted so many ways. Thanks.

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  5. I couldn't agree with you more. Hope you have a great 4th (just don't have a fifth on the 3rd). ; )

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    1. Thanks, Laurie. I respect the flag, and what it represents. Esp freedom of speech. Happy 4th in Texas!

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  6. flags have become more than a symbol. they are worshiped. it's a form of idolatry. humans seem to need to worship something.

    sonnet 41

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    1. Jello Biafra in one poem called the flag The American Swastika. It's only a symbol but it's my symbol too. Thanks.

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  7. Great work on writing about the flag and what it symbolizes. Even as it has faded, it still has strong meaning to many people.

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  8. I'm with you. Happy 4th, dear Mosk.

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  9. You hit a chord with me, despite my foamy lefty tendencies. I hate seeing those tattered flags,flown just to parade an artificial virtue. I would rather burn a bra than a flag, but to me the whole point is that its a symbol of not just nationalism--which can lead to some hefty sins--but of unity--the same 'polarity' and division everyone talks about now was just as rampant when they sewed that first flag, yet the thirteen colonies became one greater entity, and by combining despite differences, exceeded their individual limitations.

    Er, sorry--rather a long-winded response, when I could have just said I really liked this.

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  10. I've always wondered why the same people who got mad at flag burning would wear flag underwear! I mean, come on, wearing the flag on your butt.
    Okay... I may be way off base here.
    Love the poem Mosk and the strong sentiment behind it. :-)

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  11. Well done, my friend.

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  12. Well said, Mosk. We have made a rag of the flag..we are making a rag of this country with greed, lies, carelessness...tho, a symbol, it should mean more; thanks for the reminder!

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  13. Wise words, Mosk. I believe in respecting the flag, and I am glad to be an American. Simple sentiments but heartfelt.

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  14. Well done. Happy 4th.

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  15. I love the first verse particularly, as there you make me see that fading flag and feel its lonesomeness.

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